The NFL’s Colin Kaepernick dog-and-pony show about nothing was about something, after all.

It was about extinguishing the second lawsuit that Kaepernick could file for ongoing collusion plus retaliation against him for his first grievance that was settled for a payment reportedly between $1 million and $10 million.

That’s the inescapable conclusion from the assertion, as made by Kaepernick’s lawyer and Kaepernick’s agent, that the NFL demanded that he sign a broad waiver, including a waiver of potential employment claims.

Let that one sink in. The league, under the guise of acting out of the goodness of its own heart and/or to assuage the guilt of 32 months of Kaepernick being wrongfully denied an opportunity, set up a workout for all teams (even though any team could work him out at any time) and then, as he showed up for it, asked him to sign a waiver that not only protected the league and the Falcons against a torn ACL or some other injury that could have happened during the workout but also exonerated the league of any and all responsibility for the violations of his rights that may have (have) occurred since he grievance was settled in February.

As a source with knowledge of the situation tells PFT, when Kaepernick’s camp suggested a standard injury waiver that didn’t sweep broadly to absolve the NFL from its ongoing violation of his rights, league representatives said that the proposed release had been drafted by NFL general counsel Jeff Pash, and that Pash wanted his release to be signed.

Pash’s name constantly has been mentioned behind the scenes as the person who was believed to have devised this entire scheme. From Kaepernick’s perspective, it wasn’t about Roger Goodell cleansing his conscience, and it wasn’t about Jay-Z repairing his reputation. It was about Pash, recognizing that the failure to buy out Kaepernick’s ongoing employment rights in February coupled with an ongoing cold shoulder created the very real possibility for a second lawsuit that would have taken far more cold hard cash from the league than the first one.

By moving the workout from the Falcons’ facility to a new location, Kaepernick has escaped a potential checkmate. If any team representatives who were ready to watch him work out at the Falcons’ facility fails to attend the session at the alternate location, the end result could be legal checkmate for the NFL.

At this point, given the clumsy, awkward manner in which Pash’s scheme has played out, the only way to avoid a second lawsuit from Kaepernick could be to do what should have been done in the first place, if the league truly wanted to help Kaepernick: Pick up the phone and make whatever deal has to be made behind the scenes with one of the NFL’s teams to give the guy a job.

Before his big visit to Lakewood Church in Houston this Sunday, entertainer Kanye West made another stop in the city Friday. The rapper performed live before two groups of inmates at the Harris County jail.The performances were seen separately by the male and female detainees.Sheriff Ed Gonzales posted the video of the performance to the department’s Instagram page!

Video released by the Los Angeles Police Department contains audio of a woman screaming for help and shows a car driving past in what detectives are investigating as a possible kidnapping.

In the doorbell-camera video, taken at about 11:20 p.m. on Tuesday night, the woman screams, “Somebody help me. Somebody help me please.”

At the home with the security camera, a woman is seen walking out of the house, apparently to see out what is going on outside.

Seconds later, a car speeds by the house, with its trunk seemingly open.

Los Angeles police said in a statement, “Detectives are requesting the public’s help in identifying and locating the victim of a possible kidnapping” in connection to the video, which was taken in a neighborhood about five miles west of the city’s downtown.

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals issued a ruling on Friday blocking the execution of Rodney Reed just days before he was set to die. The case has generated intense interest in recent weeks, with high-profile celebrities and lawmakers from both parties calling on Gov. Greg Abbott to spare Mr. Reed after new evidence surfaced casting doubt on his guilt.

The ruling came just hours after the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles had also recommended a stay. The execution of Mr. Reed, 51, had been scheduled for Wednesday. He was convicted of the 1996 murder of Stacey Stites in Bastrop, Texas.

Texas lawmakers including Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican, and celebrities including Rihanna, Kim Kardashian West and Meek Mill had taken up Mr. Reed’s cause in recent weeks. Texas executes far more people than any other state, including eight this year.

The Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles voted Friday to recommend that Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas delay the execution of Rodney Reed by 120 days.

The case has received intense attention in recent weeks as celebrities and lawmakers have called on the governor to intervene after new evidence surfaced.

The execution of Mr. Reed, 51, is scheduled for Wednesday. He was convicted of the 1996 murder of Stacey Stites in Bastrop, Tex.

The governor can now either accept or reject the unanimous recommendation of the seven-member parole board. A spokesman for Mr. Abbott did not respond to requests for comment.

On a riverbank in Texas, a master of disguise waited patiently with his accomplice, hoping that his target, an infamous horse thief, would show himself on the trail. After four days, the hunch paid off, when the bandit unwittingly walked towards the man who haunted the outlaws of the Old West. Springing from the bushes, the cowboy confronted his frightened mark with a warrant. As the desperado reached for his weapon as a last ditch effort, the lawman shot him down before his gun could leave his side.

Though the quick-draw tale may sound like an adventure of the Lone Ranger, this was no fictional event. In fact, it was one of many feats of Bass Reeves, a legendary lawman of the Wild West—a man whose true adventures rivaled those of the outlaw-wrangling masked character. Reeves was a real-life African-American cowboy who one historian has proposed may have inspired the Lone Ranger.

In 1838—nearly a century before the Lone Ranger was introduced to the public—Bass Reeves was born a slave in the Arkansas household of William S. Reeves, who relocated to Paris, Texas, in 1846. It was in Texas, during the Civil War, that William made Bass accompany his son, George Reeves, to fight for the Confederacy.

While serving George, Bass escaped to Indian Territory under the cover of the night. The Indian Territory, known today as Oklahoma, was a region ruled by five Native American tribes—Cherokee, Seminole, Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw—who were forced from their homelands due to the Indian Removal Act of 1830. While the community was governed through a system of tribal courts, the courts’ jurisdiction only extended to members of the five major tribes. That meant anyone who wasn’t part of those tribes—from escaped slaves to petty criminals—could only be pursued on a federal level within its boundaries. It was against the backdrop of the lawless Old West that Bass would earn his formidable reputation.

Upon arriving in the Indian Territory, Bass learned the landscape and the customs of the Seminole and Creek tribes, even learning to speak their languages. After the 13th Amendment was passed in 1865, abolishing slavery, Bass, now formally a free man, returned to Arkansas, where he married and went on to have 11 children.

After a decade of freedom, Bass returned to the Indian Territory when U.S. Marshal James Fagan recruited him to help rein in the criminals that plagued the land. Fagan, under the direction of federal judge Isaac C. Parker, brought in 200 deputy marshals to calm the growing chaos throughout the West. The deputy marshals were tasked with bringing in the countless thieves, murderers and fugitives who had overrun the expansive 75,000-square-mile territory. Able local shooters and trackers were sought out for the position, and Bass was one of the few African-Americans recruited.

Standing at 6 feet 2 inches, with proficient shooting skills from his time in the Civil War and his knowledge of the terrain and language, Bass was the perfect man for the challenge. Upon taking the job, he became the first black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi.

As deputy marshal, Bass is said to have arrested more than 3,000 people and killed 14 outlaws, all without sustaining a single gun wound, writes biographer Art T. Burton, who first asserted the theory that Bass had inspired the Lone Ranger in his 2006 book, Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves.

At the heart of Burton’s argument is that fact that over 32 years as a deputy marshal, Bass found himself in numerous stranger-than-fiction encounters. Also, many of the fugitives Bass arrested were sent to the Detroit House of Corrections, in the same city where the Lone Ranger would be introduced to the world on the radio station WXYZ on January 30, 1933.

A Popeyes worker recorded throwing a woman onto the pavement outside a restaurant in Tennessee has been charged with felony aggravated assault. 29-year-old Deriance Ra’Shaiel Hughes was arrested Friday.

The victim’s attorney, Rocky McElhaney, says the 55-year-old woman remains hospitalized with a shattered elbow, six broken ribs and a broken leg. He declined to publicly identify her until authorities do so.

More to the story:

A white woman was body slammed in a Popeyes parking lot after she allegedly threw a racial epithet at employees.

The incident took place at a Popeyes restaurant in Columbia, Tennessee. According to witnesses, the woman was attempting to dispute a charge on her bill, leading to a heated argument. Several workers asked her to leave the establishment, but before she left, the woman reportedly called the employees “n****rs.” She was then followed to the parking lot by several employees, including a man who picked her up and threw her down on the pavement.

The exchange and the altercation was caught on video. In the footage, a man off-camera can be heard saying, “You in the wrong place saying the n-word.”