NO HOLIDAY BONUS FOR YOU THIS YEAR!

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Employees at the University of Houston say it feels like the Grinch is running the campus when it comes to holiday bonuses.

The employees at the school say because many of them haven’t received a raise in two years administration has decided to hand out a stipend or holiday bonus this week.

The amount given to employees who make under $50,000 a year maxes out at $1500.

However, those workers who say they may owe as little as $10 for a parking ticket on campus won’t get a bonus.

The Factor has obtained an internal memo from the school saying anyone who has outstanding debt with he University of Houston won’t get the bonus.

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Those workers say even when they tried to pay the amount they owe they were told no they still won’t be able to get the bonus and the administration is standing by its position.

That left some calling those in charge the Grinch who stole their bonuses.   

We placed a call to the school’s communications director and we’re still waiting on a response.  

University of Houston reverses policy:
University of Houston Statement:

Higher education, nationwide, is under pressure to find more efficient ways of operation. While the University of Houston experienced record-breaking enrollment this year, the academic budget year runs a year behind. The funding associated with the current enrollment increase will come in September of 2015. Accordingly, the enrollment dip experienced last year has an impact this year. As a result, the University did not award across-the-board or merit increases this year.

With limited resources available, the administration assembled a faculty and staff team, with representatives from both the Faculty Senate and Staff Council, to address ways to reallocate resources. This team established as its top priority the creation of a one-time bonus of $1,500 for all faculty and staff earning less than $50,000, with distribution to take place as soon as possible.

A total of 1,535 employees are receiving this bonus. An additional 150 employees are eligible to receive the one-time funding, but have been excluded in the first round of the award because University policy prohibits awarding bonuses to employees with delinquent University debt, until the debt is paid in full (MAPP 02.01.01, Provision 6C).

In the interest of fairness, the University is implementing a two-week extension for these 150 employees, who owe the University an average of $440. If they clear their debts with the University within this timeframe, their eligibility for the one-time $1,500 bonus will be reconsidered. The University will notify these employees by email on Monday, providing details and instructions on how they can become eligible for the bonus consideration.

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Richard Bonnin
Executive Director of Media Relations
and Digital Programming
University of Houston

5 Comments

  1. UH Employee November 14, 2014 5:42 pm 

    Thank you so much Isiah! You have truly made the holiday season better for a lot of people. We are so grateful. I’ll continue to be a loyal Isiah Factor fan!!!!

  2. Employee November 14, 2014 10:39 pm 

    Isiah! Thank you and all those who showed enough concern for the families who could do nothing but dream about the Bonus that would make thier season brighter. GOD IS GOOD!!!!

  3. Employee November 17, 2014 8:46 am 

    let’s do the math; the average is $440 owed to the university, the university will be earning over $200,000 in bonuses kept from the 150 employees who have not been given a raise in over two, three even 4 years some of us have never received a raise in the system. thanks Isiah for chimming in!! Broke @ UH.

  4. UH Employee November 17, 2014 9:05 am 

    Thank you Isiah, for helping us get our voice heard! UH needs to think of the staff and not JUST the faculty!

  5. Anonymous Reader November 18, 2014 7:56 am 

    How about focusing on the good that was done — that over 1500 employees DID receive bonuses?! A negative article about 100 employees that did not get a bonus because they do not follow institutional policies…

Comments are closed.