GREATER HOUSTON PARTNERSHIP REACHING OUT TO YOUNG PROFESSIONALS!

IF YOUR CHANCE TO GET THE GUIDANCE YOU NEED FOR THE FUTURE!

The Greater Houston Partnership today announced the launch of its Houston Young Professionals Endeavor (HYPE) program. HYPE’s mission is to groom the region’s next generation of business leadership by providing unique professional development programming and opportunities to engage with leaders of GHP Member businesses. Additionally, GHP will look to this group to offer perspective from the 21 to 40 demographic on the regional issues GHP addresses.

Forbes.com ranks Houston as one of the top cities in the U.S. for young professionals. As the premier business organization in the Houston region, GHP sees the launch of HYPE as an important step in continuing regional economic prosperity and advocating for the issues that shape our future. “To secure GHP’s legacy of leadership, we must tap into new energy from a broader range of community leaders,” says Patrick Oxford, chairman of GHP. HYPE will provide the region’s emerging leaders a forum to learn from heads of industry to enhance their professional networks and to be a voice at the table as GHP leads the way in moving this region forward.

The program will offer unique continuing education programs, professional development experiences and networking opportunities, the first of which will be a kick-off event in conjunction with The Houston Texans’ Draft Day Party at Reliant Stadium on Thursday, April 22nd.

There is no cost to join HYPE, and it is open to GHP Members and nonmembers. It will serve as a sub-committee of GHP’s Member Services committee which is chaired by Jamey Rootes, president, The Houston Texans. HYPE’s leadership team boasts up-and-coming talent from around the region and across industry sectors. The team is lead by chair Will McMullen, UBS Investment Bank, and includes:
• David T. Anderson, III, 20.10 Media, LLC
• Beau Bellow
• Cassye Cook, Sysco Corporation
• Wes Johnson, Noble Energy, Inc.
• Jen Lemanski, Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas, PC
• Benton Love, Calpine Corporation
• Max Monzon, Raintree Resorts International
• Alyssa Rodriguez, UBS Financial
• Nate Stockard, Melaroo Web Marketing

Recognizing that future business leaders are increasingly tech-savvy, HYPE is employing several social media platforms to reach the region’s young professionals with a presence on Facebook (Houston Young Professionals Endeavor – HYPE), Twitter (ghphype), LinkedIn and Ning.

For more information or to join HYPE, visit www.houston.org/hype. To RSVP for HYPE’s kick-off event, contact Abby McFarland at 713-844-3692 or amcfarland@houston.org.

PUBLISHER OF HOUSTON FORWARD TIMES DIES!

LENORA DOLL CARTER WAS A PIONEER!

Houston Forward Times Newspaper announces that the CEO and Publisher, Lenora “Doll” Carter, who guided the newspaper since 1971, died suddenly on Saturday, April 10th at her home. On Friday, April 16th the body will lie in state starting at 12 Noon at Holman Street Baptist Church, 3501 Holman Street, Houston, Texas 77004 with a celebration to be held Friday evening from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. The Homegoing Celebration will be held on Saturday, April 17th at Holman Street Baptist Church at 10:00 a.m.

The Houston Forward Times Newspaper, the South’s Largest Independently Owned and Published African-American newspaper was founded in January1960, by her late husband, Julius Carter, at which time Mrs. Carter served as General Manager and Advertising Director. After Julius’ death in 1971, Mrs. Carter became Publisher and CEO of the company.

Lenora Carter was born in Corrigan, Texas. She is currently married to James McDaniel and is the mother of two daughters, Constance Carter and Karen Carter Richards. She has three grandchildren – Jesse Frazier, II, Chelsea White, and Nykayla Richards. She graduated from McNary High School in McNary, Arizona and attended Arizona State University majoring in Business Administration.

Mrs. Carter is a member of Eta Phi Beta Sorority-XI Chapter, National Association of Market Developers, National Women of Achievement, National Newspaper Publishers Association, Texas Press Association, Greater Houston Partnership, and serves on the Board of Directors of Amalgamated Publishers, Inc. For the last seven years she served as Treasurer of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) as well a member of the Board of Directors and previously served as Secretary of NNPA.

PREPARE TO HOP ON THE BUS INSTEAD!

NO METRORAIL SERVICE THIS WEEKEND!

Texas Children’s Hospital is building a bridge that will close a portion of Fannin in the Texas Medical Center. This will require METRO to shut down light rail and run bus service during the weekend.

Please be advised of the following schedule:

When: 8 p.m. Friday, April 16 to 2 p.m. Sunday, April 18

Where: All rail stations will be closed

Why: To allow construction of a bridge for Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH)

Starting at approximately 8:00 p.m. on Friday night, METRO will operate a bus bridge for the entire rail system.


METRO will provide bus service for the rail corridor as follows:

Friday, April 16:

8 – 9 p.m. – 10-minute frequency (frequency refers to the time between buses)

9 p.m. – 2 a.m. – 12-minute frequency

Saturday, April 17:

5:15 a.m. – 9 p.m. – 6-minute frequency

9 p.m. – 2 a.m. – 10-minute frequency

Sunday, April 18:

5:15 a.m. – 2 p.m. – 6-minute frequency

The last northbound train will depart Fannin South at 7:45 p.m.

The last southbound train will depart University of Houston at 8:30 p.m. arriving at Fannin South at 9 p.m.

Buses will utilize the 700 Rail Shuttle route (see attachment) except in the Medical Center area (Dryden and Memorial Hermann Stations)

Buses will serve the Medical Center on Main Street between Pressler and Cambridge (formerly Macgregor).

METRO personnel will be available at both the Memorial Hermann Hospital/Houston Zoo and Dryden/TMC stations to assist patrons. These are the only two stations along the rail bus shuttle route affected by the Fannin lane closures. Patrons will need to walk one block west to Main Street to access the temporary rail bus shuttle stops.

Normal service will resume by 2 p.m. on Sunday.

HE’S NOW CAPTAIN RAUL DAVID REYES!

THEY’RE CLIMBING UP THE LADDER!

The wait is over and now it’s official. Raul David Reyes has officially earned the status of Captain in the Houston Fire Department. The proud ranking Houston firefighter is the son of veteran firefighter Asst. Chief Raul and Margie Reyes. Reyes Jr. was given his promotion and new badge by Acting Houston Fire Chief Rick Flanagan last week. He joined the department in 2004 and before that he served our country in the Air Force. Here are some photos of the big event the Insite has obtained. Congratulations to Captain Raul Reyes!

TELL ALL OPRAH BOOK CLAIMS TV QUEEN EXAGGERATES!

WILL YOU READ THE UNAUTHORIZED OPRAH BOOK?

USA TODAY: Over the years, Kitty Kelley has claimed that Nancy Reagan and Sinatra had long private “lunches” in the White House — read between the quote marks — and that George W. Bush snorted cocaine at Camp David when his father was president.

In her newest opus, Kelley takes on Winfrey, perhaps one of the most overexposed celebrities in America, following her from her poor childhood and promiscuous youth to her life as one of the most wealthy, powerful and secretive businesswomen in the world.

One question readers will expect Kelley to answer: Are Winfrey and best friend Gayle King really lovers?

“I know people are expecting me to ‘out’ her. But I think she’s just asexual,” Kelley says. “She’s poured all of her energies into her career. And if she is, she is never ever, ever going to come out. So relax, people.”

High-def Oprah

As for Stedman Graham, Winfrey’s longtime companion, one Kelley source in the book calls him “nice enough but boring as hell. So boring.” Those who say they have spent time with the two told Kelley they’re rarely demonstrative.

What Kelley discovered while investigating Winfrey was, not surprisingly, her need to be in control, plus what Kelley calls Winfrey’s “world of secrets.”

Winfrey makes all employees sign confidentiality agreements — and if she is spoken about in public, they have to refer to her as Mary, not Oprah, just in case someone is eavesdropping.

“And now she’s made me keep secrets,” says Kelley, who claims she knows who Winfrey’s real father is but won’t divulge it until Winfrey’s mother tells her daughter, something she has been unwilling to do for decades.

Kelley spent three days in Winfrey’s hometown, Kosciusko, Miss., chatting up Katharine Esters, Winfrey’s cousin who goes by “Aunt” Katharine, then talked to Vernon Winfrey in his Nashville barbershop. (He raised Oprah early on but says he’s not her father.)

Neither believes Winfrey’s stories about sexual abuse in her youth. (Winfrey says she was “continually molested” from age 9 until 14, and she did give birth to a baby boy at 15 — her uncle was suspected of being the father.)

“I don’t believe a bit of it,” Esters told Kelley. “No one in the family believes her stories (of sexual abuse) but now that she’s so rich and powerful everyone is afraid to contradict her.”

Kelley says she found that many of the stories Winfrey has told over the years may be “elaborated.”

“I tried to give both sides,” Kelley says. “Oprah’s stories are colorful and a bit over the top. Maybe they’re just little exaggerations.”

Kelley, who likes to say “the truth is as important to me as it is to my subjects,” — the quote “Tell the truth but ride a fast horse” hangs over her desk — says readers will get to see a “clearer” Oprah in her book. “It’s like watching high-definition TV. It’s more detailed. You’re going to see her better.”

That includes a woman who can go from being amazingly petty to astonishingly magnanimous. (Winfrey, at 56, is worth at least $2.4 billion and has given away millions over the years.)

“You think she’s warm, but she’s really quite aloof,” Kelley says. “She gives it all to the camera.”

One problem facing Kelley this week is promoting her new biography. Many of Winfrey’s pals have circled their wagons. The View‘s Barbara Walters, CNN‘s Larry King, CBS’ David Letterman and PBSCharlie Rose have all refused to have Kelley on their shows.

“All said very openly that it was because of Oprah,” she says. “And they haven’t even had a chance to look at the book yet.” She is booked on the Today show today and Bill O’Reilly’s show Tuesday.

THE BOOK IS SET TO BE RELEASED ON TUESDAY!

USA TODAY: DESIGNING WOMEN STAR DIES IN HOUSTON!

DIXIE CARTER’S BATTLE WITH CANCER ENDS HERE!

Dixie Carter, the Designing Women star who used her Southern charm, quick wit and stately beauty in a host of roles on Broadway and television, died Saturday. She was 70.

Publicist Steve Rohr, who represents Carter and her husband, actor Hal Holbrook, said Carter died Saturday morning.Rohr told The Associated Press on Sunday that Carter died in Houston of complications of endometrial cancer.

“This has been a terrible blow to our family,” Holbrook said in a written statement. “We would appreciate everyone understanding that this is a private family tragedy.”

A native of Tennessee, Carter was most famous for playing wisecracking Southerner Julia Sugarbaker for seven years on Designing Women, the CBS sitcom that ran from 1986 to 1993. The series was the peak of a career in which she often played wealthy and self-important but independent Southern women.

She was nominated for an Emmy in 2007 for her seven-episode guest stint on the ABC hit Desperate Housewives.

Carter’s other credits include roles on the series Family Law and Different Strokes.

She married Holbrook in 1984. The two had met four years earlier while making the TV movie The Killing of Randy Webster, and although attracted to one another, each had suffered two failed marriages and were wary at first.

They finally wed two years before Carter landed her role on Designing Women. Holbrook appeared on the show regularly in the late 1980s as her boyfriend, Reese Watson.

The two appeared together in her final project, the 2009 independent film That Evening Sun, shot in Tennessee and based on a short story by Southern novelist William Gay.

The middle of three children, Carter was born in 1939 in McLemoresville, Tenn.

Carter was the daughter of a grocery and department store owner who died just three years ago at 96. She said at the time of his death that he taught her to believe in people’s essential goodness.

“When I asked him how he handled shoplifting in his new store, which had a lot of goods on display, making it impossible to keep an eye on everything, he said, ‘Most people are honest, and if they weren’t, you couldn’t stay in business because a thief will find a way to steal,’” Carter said. “‘You can’t really protect yourself, but papa and I built our business believing most people are honest and want to do right by you.’”

Carter grew up in Carroll County and made her stage debut in a 1960 production of Carousel in Memphis. It was the beginning of a decades-long stage career in which she relied on her singing voice as much as her acting.

She appeared in TV soap operas in the 1970s, but did not become a national star until her recurring roles on Different Strokes and another series, Filthy Rich, in the 1980s.

Those two parts led to her role on Designing Women, a comedy about the lives of four women at an interior design firm in Atlanta.

Carter and Delta Burke played the sparring sisters who ran the firm. The series also starred Annie Potts and Jean Smart.

The show, whose reruns have rarely left the airwaves, was not a typical sitcom. It tackled such topics as sexism, ageism, body image and AIDS.

“It was something so unique, because there had never been anything quite like it,” Potts told The Associated Press at a 2006 cast reunion. “We had Lucy and Ethel, but we never had that exponentially expanded, smart, attractive women who read newspapers and had passions about things and loved each other and stood by each other.”

Carter appeared on the drama Family Law from 1999 to 2002, and in her last major TV appearance she played Gloria Hodge, the surly mother-in-law to Marcia Cross‘s Bree on Desperate Housewives.

Carter said the role was far from the kindly woman she played on Designing Women.

“It’s a vast difference,” Carter said while filming the series. “Gloria Hodge doesn’t have any redeeming qualities except her intelligence.”

In addition to Holbrook, Carter is survived by daughters Mary Dixie and Ginna.

TEXAS GETS SNOW: THIS IS NOT A REAL NEWS STORY!

THESE ARE SOUNDBITES FROM VARIOUS INTERVIEWS BUT THIS IS NOT REAL SO DON’T TAKE IT AS A LEGITIMATE NEWS REPORT!

ANOTHER INSITE PRODUCTION ON THE IMAC!