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The Coronavirus Reality

COVID MORTGAGE HELP THAT TURNED INTO A NIGHTMARE!

DID YOUR MORTGAGE DEFERMENT TURN INTO A NIGHTMARE?

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The Coronavirus Reality

WANTED FOR SEXUALLY ABUSING A CHILD MULTIPLE TIMES!

Crime Stoppers and the Houston Police Department’s Special Victims Division need the public’s assistance locating fugitive Mario Hernandez, who is wanted for Continuous Sexual Assault of a Child. 
 
Between August of 2019 and May of 2020, the fugitive sexually assaulted the child victim in the 13300 block of Northborough Drive in Houston, Texas. During the investigation, the child victim made an outcry of sexual assault. Detectives learned that the fugitive, Mario Hernandez, continuously sexually assaulted the victim.  
 
Fugitive Mario Francisco Hernandez is a Hispanic male, 44 years old, approximately 5’08”, 220 lbs., with brown eyes and short curly brown hair. The fugitive has been charged with Continuous Sexual Assault of a Child under Harris County warrant #1678787. 
 
Crime Stoppers may pay up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, charging and/or arrest of the suspect in this case. Information may be reported by calling 713-222-TIPS (8477), submitted online at www.crime-stoppers.org or through the Crime Stoppers mobile app. Only tips and calls DIRECTLY TO Crime Stoppers are anonymous and eligible for a cash reward. 

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The Coronavirus Reality

THE BABY BLUE BANDIT STRIKES AGAIN WEARING BLACK!

The FBI Violent Crime Task Force needs the public’s help in identifying and locating the bank robber dubbed “The Baby Blue Bandit” who struck again, but this time he wore black. Crime Stoppers of Houston is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to the identification and arrest of the suspect.

On August 6, 2020, at approximately 9:24 a.m., the man walked into the First Convenience Bank located at 5801 S. Gessner Rd. He approached an open teller station, presented a note demanding cash and threatened the teller. The teller complied, fearing for personal safety. The suspect ran away with an undisclosed amount of money and was seen heading southbound on S. Gessner Rd.  

The FBI Violent Crime Task Force is also seeking the identity of this suspect in connection with a robbery that took place at the First Convenience Bank located within a Kroger at 9919 Westheimer Rd., in Houston, Texas on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Find those details at: https://www.houstonpolicerobbery.org/2020/08/identity-of-west-houston-bank-robbery.html

“The Baby Blue Bandit” is now described as a light-skinned African-American male, between in his 30s or 40s, approximately 5’9” tall with a thin body build. The suspect wore a black hoodie with the hood up with an unknown logo on the front, a white mask, white gloves, a black do-rag, black sunglasses, black pants, and black sneakers.

New bank surveillance photos of the suspect are attached and posted on Twitter @FBIHouston.

Crime Stoppers of Houston is offering up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification and arrest of this bank robber. If you have any information, please call the Crime Stoppers tip line at 713-222-TIPS (8477) or the FBI Houston Field Office at (713) 693-5000. Text TIP610 plus your tip to CRIMES (274637) or visit www.crime-stoppers.org. Tips may also be submitted to Crime Stoppers through the Crime Stoppers of Houston app, which can be downloaded at the app store for both iPhone and Android devices. All tipsters remain anonymous.

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The Coronavirus Reality

DEADLINE APPROACHING FOR FEDERAL GRANT FOR BUSINESSES STRUGGLING AFTER COVID 19!

APPLY FOR THE PPP LOAN HERE: https://www.kabbage.com/paycheck-protection-program-loans/

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The Coronavirus Reality

MAN GETS COVID-19 THREE TIMES AND COUNTING!

Rick Hooks

A man who said he’s had COVID-19 three times and has been hospitalized for four months is warning people to take the virus seriously.

Rick Hooks is a friend of Channel 2′s Tom Jones. Hooks told him he thought the virus had taken his last breath.

“It was over Tom. Over. 90% dead, 10% alive,” he said from his hospital bed at the Northeast Georgia Medical Center. “Coronavirus tore my whole body up.”

Hooks was in a coma in the intensive care unit on a ventilator. That’s where he says he had a near death, dark experience.

“Like you are in mud. You can’t hear. You can see. You can see people floating by you,” he recounted. He says that’s when he put his hands up. “God grabbed it and said, ‘I ain’t done with you, yet.'”

Jones met Hooks in early March at a restaurant. Weeks later Hooks got sick and was admitted into the hospital.

Hooks said doctors told him he and COVID-19 were in a fierce battle for his life.

“He told me I had it three times,” Hooks said.

Hooks has been in the hospital the last four months and said the virus has taken a toll on his body.

“Blood clots on my left-hand side. Lungs compromised. The extremities. You got to learn how to walk again,” he explained.

His doctor said he never gave up.

“He said I was a miracle. You look at my chart, people don’t make it back where I came from,” Hooks said in amazement.

Hooks wants people to take this virus seriously and wear a mask. He admits he didn’t at first.

“The ego is big,” Hooks said. “I ain’t going to get sick. God said, ‘Okay. Play with me if you want to.’”

Hooks has no idea when he is getting out of the hospital.

He’s seen people fighting over whether they should or shouldn’t wear masks.

He said you don’t want to end up like him.

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The Coronavirus Reality

THE MOVE TO GET RID OF RACIST STREET SIGNS IN MISSOURI CITY!

Turning thepage on an offensive and racially-insensitive part of Missouri City’s street naming history, Councilmembers are set to hold a public hearing at their Monday, Aug. 3 Regular Virtual Meeting to receive comments for or against a related ordinance.

The meeting starts at 7 p.m. and the public may sign up to speak on the agenda item, which is 7b1, via this City website link: https://bit.ly/39pw73Q and they may tune in to hear the discussion via this live stream website link: https://www.missouricitytx.gov/780/MCTV.

“It’s time for a change and this official discussion and action to ensure that subdivision and street names are not historically offensive to ethnic groups is long overdue,” said Mayor Yolanda Ford, who initially raised the issue before September, 2019. “These offensive street names are unacceptable in a City as diverse as ours and they were unfortunately approved to be designated by past leadership. On Monday night, the current body of elected officials will address those unjust actions with justice and move our community forward in a more constructive manner.”

To address inquiries regarding the ordinance, staff compiled the following list of frequently asked questions:

What specific ordinance will MCTX Councilmembers consider on Monday, Aug. 3?

The specific ordinance that City Council will consider amending on the first of two readings is Chapter 82 of the Missouri City Code, which establishes regulations for the naming of new streets. Staff will present an approval process to Council that will provide for a more formalized process to review and approve new street names. Historically, the City’s process for new street names has been part of platting and regulations currently only consist of a developer/builder/applicant providing a list of their proposed names and showing the names on a subdivision plat. Staff then reviews the submissions to ensure that the name doesn’t duplicate an existing name and that the number of characters, including spaces, does not exceed a maximum amount so that a standard street sign can be created and posted.

“As it stands now, there are a number of street names throughout the City that are offensive and two of them were possibly named for Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, who was the original grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan,” said City Manager Odis Jones. “Customarily, throughout this country it is an honorary privilege to have a street named after an individual. And some consider this privilege to Forrest to be unwarranted given the context he holds in history and what his actions symbolized and stood for within the black community.”

Mr. Jones added that “the demographics of Missouri City signal that regulations and operations need to transition and reflect the full diversity of the dynamic cultures represented in our community and the value of their customs and contributions.”

What would the proposed ordinance standards accomplish:

To address the issue of controversial names, the proposed ordinance would provide the following:

Ø  Non-racial and non-offensive names (a person, event, place) can only be used if such has made a significant positive contribution to the City, community or overall humanity.

Ø  Overused words would be retired; for example, the word “Plantation” is used at least 21 times in street names within the City and ETJ (extraterritorial jurisdiction).

Additionally, a developer/builder/plat applicant would have to submit background information with the street names proposed. That information would then be reviewed by staff and a recommendation on approval/disapproval made to the Planning & Zoning Commission. If P&Z disapproves a name, an appeal could be made to City Council for reconsideration. Once the agenda item moves to Council, the Members would take action after hosting a public hearing.

For existing street names, such as the ones in the Vicksburg subdivision, that process was already adopted by previous City leaders.

What are some street names residents consider offensive?

Ø  Bedford Forrest Court and Bedford Forrest Drive, which were possibly named for Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, who was the original grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan

Ø  Breckinridge Lane, which was possibly named for Civil War Confederate Maj. Gen. John Breckinridge

Ø  Stonewall Court, which was possibly named for Confederate General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson

These streets are in the purple area of the map below and are in the Vicksburg subdivision.

Other controversial street names around the City include: Plantation Creek Drive, Plantation Lakes Drive, Plantation Wood Lane, Plantation Ridge Drive and Plantation Hollow Court. Some of the signs that have the word ‘plantation’ on them reference places of heinous acts and abuse that existed in the past such as the Palmer Plantation in Lake Olympia.

“These names on City street signs dilute our multicultural brand and our goals of inclusion and acceptance of all residents no matter what their cultures or traditions are,” said Mayor Ford. “And because of that I am looking forward to getting this ordinance amendment approved on the first reading this Monday and finalized on the second reading, which will take place at the Monday, August 17th Council meeting.”

Has any other official City board provided feedback or taken action on the ordinance amendment?

The Planning & Zoning Commission discussed the issue at several meetings and issued a final report with a negative recommendation. The Commission said that the concept seems good in theory however, more clarification is needed on a process to determine the acceptability of new names. Additionally, Commissioners expressed concern about the time needed to research a proposed name before action was required. To view P&Z Meetings, visit this City website page: https://www.missouricitytx.gov/381/Planning-Zoning.

For updates, please watch the City website: www.missouricitytx.gov, like us on Facebook—fb/MissouriCityTX, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat—@MissouriCityTX and Nextdoor, watch Missouri City Television (Ch. 16 on Comcast and Ch. 99 on AT&T U-verse) or download the MCTX Mobile app (available for free in Google Play and the Apple app store). 

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The Coronavirus Reality

WANTED FOR SEXUALLY ASSAULTING A CHILD!

Crime Stoppers and the Houston Police Department’s Special Victims Division need the public’s assistance locating fugitive David Alcazar, who is wanted for two counts of Sexual Assault of a Child. 

On Tuesday, August 6, 2019, the fugitive sexually assaulted the juvenile victim in the 12000 block of Bissonnet Street in Houston, Texas. During the investigation detectives learned that the fugitive, David Alcazar, sexually assaulted the victim.  

Fugitive David Alcazar is a Hispanic male, 37 years old, approximately 5’05”, 170 lbs., with brown eyes and black hair. The fugitive was last known to be driving a beige Toyota Sienna van and works for an unknown offshore company. 

Crime Stoppers may pay up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, charging and/or arrest of the suspect in this case. Information may be reported by calling 713-222-TIPS (8477), submitted online at www.crimestoppers.org or through the Crime Stoppers mobile app. Only tips and calls DIRECTLY TO Crime Stoppers are anonymous and eligible for a cash reward. 

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The Coronavirus Reality

SIX FORMER HOUSTON POLICE OFFICERS INDICTED!

A grand jury Thursday indicted six retired Houston Police officers for 17 felonies, determining there was sufficient evidence for the cases to proceed toward trial, Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg announced.

The grand jury’s decision comes weeks after the men were charged by prosecutors with crimes uncovered during an ongoing investigation of the Houston Police Department Narcotics Division.

Grand jurors Thursday added two more felony charges against one of the former officers.

The ongoing probe, led by the District Attorney’s Office Civil Rights Division, was prompted by the slayings of a husband, wife and their dog, shot to death by narcotics officers during a botched raid at a home on Harding Street in January 2019.

“These indictments reinforce our decision to prosecute the graft, greed and corruption in this troubled Houston Police division,” Ogg said. “We look forward to presenting all of the evidence in a courtroom to a jury and the people of Harris County.”

The indictments are the next procedural step for the six retired officers, including Gerald Goines, Steven Bryant, three supervisors and a senior police officer, who were charged on July 1.

An indictment is a formal charge handed down after s grand jury comprised of members of the community reviews cases to determine whether there is enough evidence to warrant a criminal charge. Grand jury proceedings are secret by law.

Five of the six former officers were charged with falsifying documentation about drug payments to confidential informants, sometimes with the support of supervisors.

Goines had previously been indicted on charges of felony murder and tampering with government records. Bryant had previously been indicted for tampering with government records.

The other four include: former sergeants Clemente Reyna and Thomas Wood, former lieutenant Robert Gonzales, and former senior officer, Hodgie Armstrong.

The charges stem from allegations that include using false information to get judges to sign search warrants; falsifying time sheets, putting false information in offense reports and falsifying government documents to steal.

As part of the probe, prosecutors have notified hundreds of defendants who were arrested by Goines that there may be problems with their criminal convictions and have asked the courts to appoint lawyers to review their legal options.

The District Attorney’s Office has already reviewed and agreed with defense attorneys in two cases that men convicted because of Goines were actually innocent of the charges.

Indictments for the former officers include:

Officer Gerald Goines – Two counts of felony murder, a first-degree felony punishable by a possible sentence of life in prison. Four counts of tampering with a government record (search warrants) a third-degree felony, one count of aggregate theft by a public servant between $2,500 and $30,000, a third-degree felony. Third-degree felonies are punishable by two to 10 years in prison.

Officer Steven Bryant – One count of aggregate theft by a public servant between $2,500 and $30,000, a third-degree felony.

Two counts of tampering with a government record (confidential informant forms which contain details of money allegedly given to informants for services or buying drugs) a state jail felony. State jail felonies are punishable by six months to two years in state jail

Sgt. Clemente Reyna – Three counts of tampering with a government record (confidential informant forms) a state jail felony. One count of aggregate theft by a public servant between $2,500 and $30,000, a third-degree felony.

Sgt. Thomas Wood – One count of tampering with a government record (confidential informant form) a state jail felony. One count of aggregate theft by a public servant between $2,500 and $30,000, a third-degree felony.

Lt. Robert Gonzales – One charge of misapplication of fiduciary property, a state jail felony, for the reckless handling of HPD money. Gonzales held a position of trust and was required to verify and authorize any expenditures of up to $2,500.

Officer Hodgie Armstrong – two charges of tampering with a government record, (an offense report and a confidential informant form) state jail felonies, one charge of aggregate theft by a public servant, a third degree felony.

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The Coronavirus Reality

THE DEBATE OVER FACE MASKS AFTER THE DEATH OF HERMAN CAIN!

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The Coronavirus Reality

DETAILS OF THE NEW STIMULUS PACKAGED RELEASED!

Second Stimulus Check Details

While the exact language has to be worked out, if the second stimulus check is the same as the first, this is how it will be structured.

It would give an advance on a refundable tax credit of $1,200 to qualifying Americans plus an additional $500 for dependent children under 17 years old.

The qualification is based on your adjusted gross income:

  • Single filers who earn less than $75,000 a year will get the full benefit. Those who earn more will see their check reduced by 5% of the amount they earn over $75,000.
  • Joint filers who earn less than $150,000 a year will get the full benefit. Those who earn more will see their check reduced by 5% of the amount they earn over $150,000.

This is lower than what was proposed by the Heroes Act but since it matches the amounts of the Cares Act, anyone who received a check from the first stimulus check would receive the same one for the second stimulus check.